Dr. Angela D. Reddix appears on Coast Live

April Woodard:
Our next guest is here to inspire Dr Angela Reddix founder of Envision Lead Grow the nonprofit teaches young people, especially girls to succeed through entrepreneurship.

Dr. Reddix, welcome back to Coast Live how are you doing.

Dr. Reddix:
Thank you, I’m fantastic April. Great to be here.

April Woodard:
So last time we talked about Envision Lead Grow but, we didn’t talk about your background. So tell me about how you started your own business and how that transferred to helping young girls.

Dr. Reddix:
My goodness, my story’s a little different in that I started this business because I was asked to start a business based on expertise that I had acquired over the years. Um, and so I had a contract as a sub contractor before I even started the business. Wow. Um, and then it grew from one to over a hundred employees and there’s a whole lot in that story, we are approaching our 13th year in November.

Dr. Reddix:
So there’s a whole lot to that story, but what actually transfers to Envision Lead Grow and why I do Envision Lead Grow. Today there is still one in five children living in poverty according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and so that’s really my story. Um, my truth is I was born in Liberty Park down the street, um, public housing to a single mother, teenage mother. Um, it was the community that wrapped their arms around me that said I was going to succeed. That really propelled me to go through all that I went through. My undergrad at JMU, my masters, and then later on in life getting my PHD. Um, and so I know that the power and promise of the community can transform communities of poverty, um, through little girls just like me who grow up and imagine if it in each of these communities, if one girl could hire a hundred employees, we infuse income into those communities and we changed them from poverty to prosperity through the power and promise of little girls. So, that’s where Envision Lead Grow came from.

April Woodard:
Well, I had a chance to speak to some of your girls and my daughter actually participated in it. I have to say how much confidence she had after being a part of that program. Tell me about what you do for the girls in that week or two-week segment.

Dr. Reddix:
Absolutely. It starts with a camp program, but it’s really a four pronged approach. So we have the girls this year we’ll be in four locations, Old Dominion University, Norfolk State University and Oklahoma State University. We’re getting girls from 30 states throughout the United States, mainly from Maine to Florida and over to Oklahoma. In that first week we spend with them, they are actually learning business skills. They’re learning to be able to communicate verbally and through writing. They are building business plans. They’re pitching, getting on stage in front of hundreds of people and pitching their ideas.

Dr. Reddix:
So that’s the first part. The second part is after that camp they’re paired with mentors for the full year. Um, the third part is we continue through virtual training. We continue to build this community of girls, once a month through webinars. And then the fourth part, the top performers go to Washington DC for each conference center. Um, and they actually are tutored in business by fortune 100 female executives and successful entrepreneurs. So, um, that’s the, the four pronged approach. And we are transforming minds, lives. These girls are doing amazing things at just 10 years old.

April Woodard:
Wow, that’s amazing. Talk to me about the importance of creating girl bosses.

Dr. Reddix:
Oh my goodness. So it’s not just about, I will tell you our girls, 97% of them actually formed businesses. So this is not just talking about business, but they’re doing it they’re raising in one year of being in the program, over $2,000 in profit.

Dr. Reddix:
So not just revenue but profit. So they’re doing it, but bigger than that, their confidence, their ability to understand, um, the sound of their voice and they raise their hand faster now. So they’re not just waiting to be asked and told. They’re saying, listen, I have something of value to say to add to this conversation in my world. If we can start them at 10 years old women coming into the business with confidence, then we have a different workforce in the future. So entrepreneurs or entrepreneurial mindset, that’s what we’re building.

April Woodard:
Wonderful. And I know that you said ODU and Norfolk State is paying for the program via sponsorship. How can people get involved and how can people help Envision Lead Grow?

Dr. Reddix:
Absolutely. We’re looking for volunteers. We’re looking for, we have some openings in the Hampton roads area, all seven cities. We still have some space. If your girls are between 10 and 14 years old, um, please go to http://envisionleadgrow.org for more information or call our offices. We’re always looking for sponsors. I’m proud to say that Towne Bank is now a major sponsor of the program and we are always looking for more.

April Woodard:
Wonderful. Dr. Angela. Thank you so much.

Dr. Reddix:
Thank you.